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Staff Picks

aviatrix

Raymonde de Laroche - first woman to receive a pilot's license 1910

March - Women's History Month

Kill

Kill the Father by Sandrone Dazieri

When a woman is beheaded in a park outside Rome and her six-year-old son goes missing, Deputy Captain Colomba Caselli and Dante Torre, both still recovering from personal catastrophes, team up to solve the series of killings and abductions that ensues. As they follow the ever-more-bizarre trail of clues, one thing becomes clear: what's really going on is much darker than anyone imagined.

Recommended by Stacy

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Forty

Forty Autumns by Nina Willner

"In this illuminating and deeply moving memoir, a former American military intelligence officer goes beyond traditional Cold War espionage tales to tell the true story of her family--of five women separated by the Iron Curtain for more than forty years, and their miraculous reunion after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Forty Autumns makes visceral the pain and longing of one family forced to live apart in a world divided by two.

Recommended by Linda

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Paris

The Paris Wife by Paula McLain

Hadley Richardson is intrigued by brash Ernest Hemingway. After a brief courtship and small wedding, they take off for Paris, where Hadley makes a convincing transformation from an overprotected child to a game and brave young woman who puts up with impoverished living conditions and shattering loneliness to prop up her husband's career.

Recommended by Sharon

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Clouds

The Clouds Beneath the Sun by MacKenzie Ford

Kenya, 1961. When Natalie Nelson’s plane lands at a remote airstrip in the Serengeti, she knows she’s run just about as far as she can from home. Trained as an archeologist, she accepted an invitation to join a famous excavating team in order to escape England and the painful memories of her past. But before she can get her bearings, the dig is surrounded by controversy involving the local Maasai people, and Natalie is swept up in a passionate affair that threatens to spark even more violence and turmoil.

Recommended by Becky

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Gentleman

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in another elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov. When, in 1922, he is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the count is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life, and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel's doors. Unexpectedly, his reduced circumstances provide him a doorway into a much larger world of emotional discovery.

Recommended by Jeff

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Children

The Children's Crusade by Ann Packer

The Children's Crusade is an extraordinary tale of a physician, his wife and their four children. Set in Northern California, it is a coming-of-age tale of family as well as an American pastoral; the language is beautiful, painterly, even as it shows us how much of our adult identity has been fully formed in childhood. Ann Packer’s eye for detail, her genius at evoking an era with such faithfulness, and her mastery of story make us identify with and deeply care for her characters.

Recommended by Sheryl

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Walk

The Long Walk: the true story of a trek to freedom by Slavomir Rawicz

In 1941, the author and six other fellow prisoners escaped a Soviet labor camp in Yakutsk--a camp where enduring hunger, cold, untended wounds, untreated illnesses, and avoiding daily executions were everyday feats. Their march--over thousands of miles by foot--out of Siberia, through China, the Gobi Desert, Tibet, and over the Himalayas to British India is a remarkable statement about man's desire to be free.

Recommended by Karel

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Lost

The Lost City of the Monkey God by Douglas Preston

Douglas Preston takes readers on an adventure deep into the Honduran jungle in this riveting, danger-filled true story about the discovery of an ancient lost civilization.

Recommended by Gwen

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George

George by Alex Gino

When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she's not a boy. She knows she's a girl. George thinks she'll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte's Web. George really, really, REALLY wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can't even try out for the part . . . because she's a boy. With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan. Not just so she can be Charlotte -- but so everyone can know who she is, once and for all.

Recommended by Zach

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Down

Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell

The adventures of a broke British writer as he works as a dishwasher in Paris and stays in homeless shelters in London.

Recommended by Karel

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bear

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

In a village at the edge of the wilderness of northern Russia, where the winds blow cold and the snow falls many months of the year, a stranger with piercing blue eyes presents a new father with a gift - a precious jewel on a delicate chain, intended for his young daughter. Uncertain of its meaning, Pytor hides the gift away and Vasya grows up a wild, willful girl, to the chagrin of her family. But when mysterious forces threaten the happiness of their village, Vasya discovers that, armed only with the necklace, she may be the only one who can keep the darkness at bay.

Recommended by Alice

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Telomere

The Telomere Effect by Elizabeth Blackburn

Discusses the end sections of each chromosome called telomeres, the enzyme that replenishes them, their role in the aging process, and specific lifestyle habits to that protect telomeres, slow down disease, and lengthen life.

Recommended by Stacy

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