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Keeping Our Community Safe

2018 Home Fire Sprinkler Day

Home Fire Sprinkler Day Logo

Save the Date! Saturday, May 19, 2018

Every day, seven people die from U.S. home fires. The time has come to bring attention to this problem and its solution on a national scale.

NFPA's Fire Sprinkler Initiative and the Home Fire Sprinkler Coalitionare initiating Home Fire Sprinkler Day. This project tasks fire sprinkler advocates across America with hosting simultaneous events that promote home fire sprinklers. These events are aimed at drawing awareness to this life-saving technology while breaking down the myths and legislative barriers to its use. The goal is to have safety advocates host at least one sprinkler-related event in all 50 states.

Taking action is easy. We've outlined some ideas and have given you the resources to make your event a success. If you need any assistance or have questions, please contact us.

List of potential activities

Take part in one or more of these events. We advise checking with your state or regional fire sprinkler coalitionfirst to coordinate any events with them.

  • Host a side-by-side live burn/fire sprinkler demonstration
  • Conduct a fire departmentopen house featuring fire sprinkler information and sprinkler riser display
  • Initiate a media event/walk-through of a sprinklered home in your community
  • Dedicate a training session to your fire department staff on the myths and factsof home fire sprinklers
  • Advocate for a "Home Fire Sprinkler Day" proclamation in your town (model language coming soon)
  • Spearhead a social media campaign demanding local legislators and decision makers address local fire problem/support sprinklers
  • Write letters to the editor or op-eds underscoring your local fire problem and fire sprinkler laws or lack thereof (templates coming soon)

 

Home Fire Sprinkler Day resources

Use these resources to help convince the media and others on the necessity of fire sprinklers. Some make great handouts, while others are shareable on social media.

 

Pulse Point

PulsePoint Comes to Newport

PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices, PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Use of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services.

PulsePoint Respond

  • PulsePoint Respond is a mobile app that alerts CPR-trained citizens to someone nearby having a sudden cardiac arrest.
  • The app is activated by the local public safety communications center simultaneous with the dispatch of local fire and EMS resources.
  • The purpose of the app is to increase the survival rates of cardiac arrest victims by:

  • Reducing collapse-to-CPR times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac arrest events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area.
  • Reducing collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing awareness of public access defibrillator (AED) locations through real-time mapping of nearby devices.
  • The app is only activated if the event is occurring in a public place (the app is not typically activated for residential addresses).
  • In addition to the life-saving CPR/AED functionality, the app provides a virtual window into fire and EMS activity in the community, offering a unique opportunity for civic engagement.
  • Since the app requires a connection to the local public safety communications center, it is only available where adopted and implemented by the local Fire/EMS agency.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

  • Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year (SCA kills nearly 1,000 people a day or one person every two minutes).
  • Survival rates nationally for SCA are less than 8%.
  • Delivery of CPR is life-saving first aid, and can sustain life until paramedics arrive by helping to maintain vital blood flow to the heart and brain.
  • Only about a third of SCA victims receive bystander CPR.
  • Without oxygen-rich blood, permanent brain damage or death can occur in less than 8 minutes. After 10 minutes there is little chance of successful resuscitation. Even in modern urban settings the response times for professional rescuers commonly approach these time frames.
  • The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.
  • SCA can happen to anyone at any time. Many victims appear healthy with no known heart disease or other risk factors.
  • In April 2008, the American Heart Association revised its recommendations and encouraged lay bystanders to use compression-only CPR as an alternative to the combined rescue breathing and chest compression method. It is believed that this change will significantly increase the willingness of bystanders to perform CPR.
  • In 2015, CPR guidelines issued by the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that communities consider using mobile app technology to alert CPR responders when someone nearby suffers sudden cardiac arrest. The new guidelines cite studies that show emerging mobile technologies can result in a “higher rate of bystander-initiated CPR”.
  • Sudden Cardiac Arrest is not the same as a heart attack. A heart attack occurs when blood vessels in the heart get clogged, preventing blood flow to sections of heart muscle. A heart attack, however, can lead to SCA by triggering an abnormal heart rhythm. SCA may be compared to an electrical problem in the heart, in contrast to a heart attack, which is more of a plumbing problem.
  • Fifty-seven percent of adults in the U.S. say they have undergone training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), most often due to work or school requirements. Most say they would be willing to use CPR to help a stranger. Most say they would be willing to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). Eleven percent say they have used CPR in an actual emergency.

Learn more at www.PulsePoint.org or call us here at the station 541-265-9461.

 

Message from the Chief

Chief Rob Murphy

Welcome to the Newport Fire Department official website. NFD is comprised of 27 volunteers and 11 staff. We serve approximately 12,500 residents and 5,000-15,000 guests in the City of Newport and surrounding Newport Rural Fire Protection District. We serve these areas out of three fire stations. We are a proud, service-oriented organization with a rich history. Starting as Newport Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 on May 4, 1885, we have adapted and grown along with our community. We provide first-rate Emergency Services including: Fire Suppression, Emergency Medical Services (including Advanced Life Support), Motor Vehicle Accident Rescue and Extrication, Hazardous Materials Response, Marine and Beach Fire/Rescue Response, Fire Inspections, Investigations and Public Education. We actively participate in community activities like Newport Seafood and Wine Festival, Newport Marathon, Holiday Toy Drive, and Newport High School Senior’s Grad Night.

I invite you to please look around our website. You will find new features such as commonly requested forms, new links and more photos.

Thank you,

Rob Murphy

Fire Chief

 

Kidde Smoke Alarm Recall

News Release from Oregon State Fire Marshal

Image of Recalled Smoke Alarms

On March 21, 2018, Kidde issued a recall of 452,000 dual sensor (photoelectric and ionization) smoke alarms sold in the United States. The smoke alarms have the model numbers PI2010 (AC/hardwired) and PI9010 (DC/battery powered). "KIDDE" is printed on the front center of the smoke alarm. The model number and date code are printed on the back of the alarm.

Kidde states that a yellow protective cap in limited instances may have been left on one of the two smoke sensors during the manufacturing process, which could compromise the smoke alarms' ability to detect smoke.

Consumers should remove the alarm from the wall/ceiling and visually inspect it through the opening on the side of the alarm for the presence of a yellow cap. Consumers should not attempt to take apart the alarm, open the casing, or otherwise remove the cap themselves. If the yellow cap is present, the consumer should immediately contact Kidde to receive instructions and request a free replacement alarm. They should remove the recalled smoke alarm ONLY AFTER they receive and install the replacement alarm. If no yellow cap is present, consumers should reinstall the smoke alarm and no further action is needed.

Alarms were sold at Menards, The Home Depot, Walmart and other department, home, and hardware stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, ShopKidde.com, and other websites from September 2016 through January 2018 for between $20 and $40.

For more information, visit the Kidde website: https://kidde-smoke-alarm-recallusen.expertinquiry.com/ or the Consumer Product Safety Commission website: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2018/kidde-recalls-dual-sensor-smoke-alarms-due-to-risk-of-failure-to-alert-consumers-to-a

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal's Smoke Alarm Installation Program does not distribute Kidde smoke alarms, therefore alarms issued by the OSFM to Oregon fire agencies, the American Red Cross Cascades Region, or other organizations are not affected by this recall.

Working smoke alarms save lives. Be sure to test your smoke alarms regularly and make sure you have working smoke alarms on each level of your home, inside each bedroom, and in the hallway outside each bedroom.

If you don't have working smoke alarms contact the American Red Cross at preparedness@redcross.org or 503-528-5783.

For more information on smoke alarms visit the OSFM Smoke Alarm Information Center