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Newport Fire Department

2017-2018 Burn Season Closure

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Open Burning is Closed

The season for yard debris burning has closed. Yard debris season closed early this year in the City of Newport, Newport Rural Fire Protection District, Depoe Bay Fire District and North Lincoln Fire & Rescue District due to drier than normal weather this spring. Burn season will reopen around the first of October, when the fall rains return. This burn ban is in effect now.

The Central Oregon Coast received very little rain in the month of May. In addition, Oregon Department of Forestry, Toledo Office stated that fuel moisture levels in the county are at remarkably low levels.

Recreational fires are still allowed and do not require a permit. Anyone with questions regarding burn permits and back yard burning may call Newport Fire Department at 541-265-9461.

NFD, DBFD and NLF&R would like to point out some safety tips for recreational fires. Always have a water supply available and extinguish your fire before you leave. Keep recreational fires at least 15 feet away from any structure or combustible materials. Please be respectful of your neighbors and be mindful of where the smoke is traveling.

Making an Escape Plan

 

How to make a home fire escape plan

Your ability to get out of your home during a fire depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the smoke alarmsounds. A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors.

 

Escape planning tips

  • Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors.
  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home.NFPA 72, National Fire Alarm Code® requires interconnected smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • When you walk through your plan, check to make sure the escape routes are clear and doors and windows can be opened easily.
  • Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor's house, a light post, mailbox, or stop sign) a safe distance in front of your home where everyone can meet after they've escaped. Make sure to mark the location of the meeting place on your escape plan.
  • Go outside to see if your street number is clearly visible from the road. If not, paint it on the curb or install house numbers to ensure that responding emergency personnel can find your home.
  • Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any member of the household can call from a neighbor's home or a cellular phone once safely outside.
  • If there are infants,older adults, or family members with mobility limitations, make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the fire drill and in the event of an emergency. Assign a backup person too, in case the designee is not home during the emergency
  • If windows or doors in your home havesecurity bars, make sure that the bars have emergency release devices inside so that they can be opened immediately in an emergency. Emergency release devices won't compromise your security - but they will increase your chances of safely escaping a home fire.
  • Tell guests or visitors to your home about your family's fire escape plan. When staying overnight at other people's homes, ask about their escape plan. If they don't have a plan in place, offer to help them make one. This is especially important whenchildren are permitted to attend "sleepovers" at friends' homes. See NFPA's "Sleepover fire safety for kids" fact sheet.
  • Be fully prepared for a real fire: when a smoke alarm sounds, get out immediately. Residents ofhigh-rise and apartment buildings may be safer "defending in place."
  • Once you're out, stay out! Under no circumstances should you ever go back into a burning building. If someone is missing, inform the fire department dispatcher when you call. Firefighters have the skills and equipment to perform rescues.

 

Put your plan to the test

  • Practice your home fire escape plan twice a year, making the drill as realistic as possible.
  • Make arrangements in your plan for anyone in your home who has a disability.
  • Allow children to master fire escape planning and practice before holding a fire drill at night when they are sleeping. The objective is to practice, not to frighten, so telling children there will be a drill before they go to bed can be as effective as a surprise drill.
  • It's important to determine during the drill whether children and others can readily waken to the sound of the smoke alarm. If they fail to awaken, make sure that someone is assigned to wake them up as part of the drill and in a real emergency situation.
  • If your home has two floors, every family member (including children) must be able to escape from the second floor rooms. Escape ladders can be placed in or near windows to provide an additional escape route. Review the manufacturer's instructions carefully so you'll be able to use a safety ladder in an emergency. Practice setting up the ladder from a first floor window to make sure you can do it correctly and quickly. Children should only practice with a grown-up, and only from a first-story window. Store the ladder near the window, in an easily accessible location. You don't want to have to search for it during a fire.
  • Always choose the escape route that is safest – the one with the least amount of smoke and heat – but be prepared to escape under toxic smoke if necessary. When you do your fire drill, everyone in the family should practice getting low and going under the smoke to your exit.
  • Closing doors on your way out slows the spread of fire, giving you more time to safely escape.
  • In some cases, smoke or fire may prevent you from exiting your home or apartment building. To prepare for an emergency like this, practice "sealing yourself in for safety" as part of your home fire escape plan. Close all doors between you and the fire. Use duct tape or towels to seal the door cracks and cover air vents to keep smoke from coming in. If possible, open your windows at the top and bottom so fresh air can get in. Call the fire department to report your exact location. Wave a flashlight or light-colored cloth at the window to let the fire department know where you are located.

 

Clear Your Escape Routes

Items that block doors and windows in your home could keep you from escaping in the event of a home fire. And that could mean the difference between life and death. So unblock your exits today! Key to your family’s safety is planning and practicing a home fire escape plan twice a year. Start by identifying two escape routes out of each room, if possible, then make sure that each of those escape routes can be used safely by everyone. Download the "Clear Your Escape Routes"brochure inEnglishorSpanish.

 

Message from the Chief

Chief Rob Murphy

Welcome to the Newport Fire Department official website. NFD is comprised of 27 volunteers and 11 staff. We serve approximately 12,500 residents and 5,000-15,000 guests in the City of Newport and surrounding Newport Rural Fire Protection District. We serve these areas out of three fire stations. We are a proud, service-oriented organization with a rich history. Starting as Newport Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 on May 4, 1885, we have adapted and grown along with our community. We provide first-rate Emergency Services including: Fire Suppression, Emergency Medical Services (including Advanced Life Support), Motor Vehicle Accident Rescue and Extrication, Hazardous Materials Response, Marine and Beach Fire/Rescue Response, Fire Inspections, Investigations and Public Education. We actively participate in community activities like Newport Seafood and Wine Festival, Newport Marathon, Holiday Toy Drive, and Newport High School Senior’s Grad Night.

I invite you to please look around our website. You will find new features such as commonly requested forms, new links and more photos.

Thank you,

Rob Murphy

Fire Chief

 

Kidde Smoke Alarm Recall

News Release from Oregon State Fire Marshal

Image of Recalled Smoke Alarms

On March 21, 2018, Kidde issued a recall of 452,000 dual sensor (photoelectric and ionization) smoke alarms sold in the United States. The smoke alarms have the model numbers PI2010 (AC/hardwired) and PI9010 (DC/battery powered). "KIDDE" is printed on the front center of the smoke alarm. The model number and date code are printed on the back of the alarm.

Kidde states that a yellow protective cap in limited instances may have been left on one of the two smoke sensors during the manufacturing process, which could compromise the smoke alarms' ability to detect smoke.

Consumers should remove the alarm from the wall/ceiling and visually inspect it through the opening on the side of the alarm for the presence of a yellow cap. Consumers should not attempt to take apart the alarm, open the casing, or otherwise remove the cap themselves. If the yellow cap is present, the consumer should immediately contact Kidde to receive instructions and request a free replacement alarm. They should remove the recalled smoke alarm ONLY AFTER they receive and install the replacement alarm. If no yellow cap is present, consumers should reinstall the smoke alarm and no further action is needed.

Alarms were sold at Menards, The Home Depot, Walmart and other department, home, and hardware stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, ShopKidde.com, and other websites from September 2016 through January 2018 for between $20 and $40.

For more information, visit the Kidde website: https://kidde-smoke-alarm-recallusen.expertinquiry.com/ or the Consumer Product Safety Commission website: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2018/kidde-recalls-dual-sensor-smoke-alarms-due-to-risk-of-failure-to-alert-consumers-to-a

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal's Smoke Alarm Installation Program does not distribute Kidde smoke alarms, therefore alarms issued by the OSFM to Oregon fire agencies, the American Red Cross Cascades Region, or other organizations are not affected by this recall.

Working smoke alarms save lives. Be sure to test your smoke alarms regularly and make sure you have working smoke alarms on each level of your home, inside each bedroom, and in the hallway outside each bedroom.

If you don't have working smoke alarms contact the American Red Cross at preparedness@redcross.org or 503-528-5783.

For more information on smoke alarms visit the OSFM Smoke Alarm Information Center